A Brief Statement of my Philosophy


Music is for everyone. The mission of the Studio is to provide a meaningful experience of music to everyone.

Music is for every age. The Boyadjiev Harp Studio offers musical opportunities for every age, carefully coordinated with the developmental needs of the student.
Musical training is not just for the "talented". Every child and adult can derive great satisfaction and sense of achievement from the study of music. The Studio strives to nurture every student's capacity to share and enjoy music. For those whose love of music inspires them to a high level of commitment, the Studio offers quality training, experience and support without peer in the area.

Music deserves to be an integral part of a child's total education. The skills developed in the study of music extend far beyond studio or concert hall. The Boyadjiev Harp Studio aims to contribute to the development of discipline, good habits of mind, and socialization in every student.

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Important Information

In studying music, we are not just developing the skill to play an instrument, we are developing the ear and a sense of musical hearing and processing as well. An important component to lessons is repeated exposure to the world of classical music through listening. Some ideas:
- play classical CDs at home or in the car on a daily basis, or tune your radio frequently to a classical station (KDFC-FM or KMZT-AM in the Bay Area);
- try to see live concerts whenever possible.

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Caitriona Mc Dermott-
Student of Bertina Boyadjiev since 1993

Awards:
Caitriona was the second prize winner at the International Harp Festival in Ireland in 1993.

Second place at Granard Harp Festival in Ireland 1993.

First Place at California State Talent Competition in 1999.

Grand Champion award at California State Talent Competition, June 2001.

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Information on teaching:

The book "Sound Choices: Guiding Your Child's Musical Development" by Marianne Uszler Machover, Oxford University Press, is strongly recommended as a resource guide.
What to Expect Each Week

Private lessons are scheduled once a week. Each lesson will last 45 minutes. Every lesson's assignment will be carefully written down in the all-important assignment book, which will include:

Technique: Scales, Chords, 4-finger Patterns or other exercises to develop muscular control and agility. Theory: Flashcards, Note speller or Theory book to develop fluid reading
New Material: New songs or passages to learn
Old Material: Music to polish, perfect or memorize
I may also include duets, composition, improvisation, sight-reading or listening as part of the assignment.

To optimize progress, it is important to find the perfect balance point of stimulation. Too much work, and the students may feel overwhelmed, too little, and they become bored. In general, a perfect assignment will feel "big" or "hard" at the beginning of the week, will seem just right by day 5, and may even feel "easy" by the day of the lesson.

The homework for each student is individually designed and tailored to consider his/her unique needs, abilities and interests. It is my expectation that students will complete all of their weekly assignments to the best of their ability and will fulfill the practice requirement on a daily basis.

Parent Presence at the Lesson

It is almost always recommended that students in first and second grade have a parent either present for the duration of the lesson or available for "touching base" at the beginning and the end of each lesson to optimize home practice. Some children receive extra benefit from having a parent attend lessons on a weekly basis, others prefer to have their teacher "all to themselves".

What is the best practice routine?

A set time every day helps establish practice as part of a child 's routine. Some students thrive on morning practice, other do best after school or even right before bedtime. Beginning students can start gradually to fulfill the practice requirements: the first week - 10-15 minutes, and gradually add 5-10 minutes to the expectation for each week. Dr. Suzuki, a famous music pedagogue, once said, " You should only practice on the days that you eat."

What is my role as a parent in my child's practice?

Your support will shift with time, but your emotional support is always essential, Organizing your child's practice, telling what to play and how many times, helping with counting and note-reading. Calling attention to dynamics or phrasing will all be part of your role. If you are new to music yourself, learn alongside your child. Make music a family affair.

Students 12 and older are expected to be responsible for their own practice. At most, you can remind them of their decisions, but it is not in the best interest of budding teenagers to "make" them practice. For music to really work for adolescents, it must be something that comes from desire within.

Students of all ages, however, need you to applaud and encourage their efforts. Be an appreciative audience. Let them know how proud you are of their efforts and progress.

© 2019 by BERTINA BOYADJIEV

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